rectumofglory

I thought for a while that my son would never be interested in my comics. I was afraid they would just represent another club he couldn’t join: all those big-jawed white guys with their hair parted to the side. But thanks to Spider-Man, my son imagines himself jumping on giant robots and saving the city. I hear him doing that behind the door of his room.

 -Chris Huntington, “A Superhero Who Looks Like My Son”

killerville
When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.
reneemichelle11

upallnightogetloki:

retrogradeworks:

elizabethplaid:

incognitomoustache:

saintbucky:

Anthony Mackie being the first black superhero (and making Bill O’Reilly uncomfortable) on Jimmy Fallon (x)

I am so happy that Anthony Mackie is a person that exists.

For anyone who’s going: “But what about Storm/Hancock/Frozone/War Machine etc etc?”: they’re referring to the fact that the character Falcon was the first African-American superhero* created (debuted in Captain America #177 in 1969). If you’ve watched the clip, you’ll notice that Mackie corrects Jimmy Fallon when he says first black superhero. This is because the first black superhero was Black Panther - debuted in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 - whom lives in the fictive African country Wakanda, and is thus not a citizen of the USA.

(* = the word “superhero” is usually not used for hero characters that pre-date Superman, nor actually very often used outside the mainstream comic book companies aka DC Comics and Marvel Comics. This is why such characters as The Phantom, created in 1936 aka 2 years before Superman, and whom wears spandex and a mask and punches evil guys in the face, is not generally dubbed a super hero. Anyway, the point of this asterisk is that I have no idea how many fictional, non-“super” hero characters there were of African decent before 1966)

Reblogging for uncomfortable O’Reilly and awesome comic book information.

This is absolutely magical.

Thank you, incognitomoustache, for making this post even more of a gift than it was before.

unwinona

itstherocketeer:

theladylillibet:

briecheesie:

nathanielfick:

anthony mackie is a gift to this world and i will hear nothing against it

#this is the best interview i’ve ever seen in my entire life

He’s so damn excited. This is the guy who auditioned for 20 different marvel characters to try and get into any movie he could

I want him to be my best and greatest friend

books-and-lavender
mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.

mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.