shingekigofuckyourself
Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

transformativetidbits
emilyvgordon:

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

This is gorgeous.

emilyvgordon:

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

This is gorgeous.

thepierglass

thepierglass:

b0neflowers:

deadthing:

lucidobscurity:

creepylittlecupcake:

geekgirlsmash:

Any time someone asks me if “I’m too old for that”, I just direct them to Advanced Style.

OMG YES

This is wonderful! Hoping to be one of them if I live long enough.

Love this kinda shit.

You know I’m kinda super excited to be a very eccentric old lady.

<3 <3 <3 <3 <3 Advanced Style

guerrillafeminism
historyheroines:

Mary Fields, or Stagecoach Mary (c. 1832-1914)
Mary Fields was the first Black American woman to work for the US Postal Service.  Born into slavery, she started her almost ten-year tenure with the USPS at the age of 60 when she proved to be the fastest applicant to be able hitch a team of 6 horses.  She was so reliable in her mail deliveries that she was given the nickname “Stagecoach.”  When she couldn’t make use of her horse team due to snowfall, she would deliver the mail on snowshoe and carry the bags on her shoulders.
Mary cut an impressive and somewhat romantic figure: she was 6 feet tall, roughly 200 pounds, and armed with both a .38 pistol she carried under her apron and a jug of whiskey to chase away the chill of cold Montana weather.  She was a crack shot and smoked cigars, flummoxing the locals who didn’t know what to make of her.  Despite this reception, her heart was big: before her stint as Stagecoach Mary, she tried her hand at running a restaurant.  The restaurant eventually folded when she would feed anyone, regardless of whether or not they could pay for the food.  
More on Mary Fields here &gt;
And here &gt;

historyheroines:

Mary Fields, or Stagecoach Mary (c. 1832-1914)

Mary Fields was the first Black American woman to work for the US Postal Service.  Born into slavery, she started her almost ten-year tenure with the USPS at the age of 60 when she proved to be the fastest applicant to be able hitch a team of 6 horses.  She was so reliable in her mail deliveries that she was given the nickname “Stagecoach.”  When she couldn’t make use of her horse team due to snowfall, she would deliver the mail on snowshoe and carry the bags on her shoulders.

Mary cut an impressive and somewhat romantic figure: she was 6 feet tall, roughly 200 pounds, and armed with both a .38 pistol she carried under her apron and a jug of whiskey to chase away the chill of cold Montana weather.  She was a crack shot and smoked cigars, flummoxing the locals who didn’t know what to make of her.  Despite this reception, her heart was big: before her stint as Stagecoach Mary, she tried her hand at running a restaurant.  The restaurant eventually folded when she would feed anyone, regardless of whether or not they could pay for the food.  

More on Mary Fields here >

And here >

transformativetidbits

stlcardinals:

Today the Cardinals celebrated 3 of baseball’s finest from the St. Louis area - and these players never even wore the Birds on the Bat. Audrey Kissel, Erma Bergmann and Barbara Hoffman played in the All American Girls Professional Baseball League which inspired the 1992 film “A League of Their Own.” Kiss, Bergie and Barb played a combined 9 seasons in the women’s professional baseball league which existed from 1943 to 1954. Erma even threw a no-hitter back on May 22, 1947.

Audrey and Barbara, along with the Bergmann family, surprised Erma for her 90th birthday by bringing her to Busch to throw out the ceremonial pitch. These women truly are still in a league of their own.

killerville

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow:  The 8 year old Chef Taylor Moxey

What began as a way for Taylor to make extra money for a toy has evolved into a successful company out of her parents’ Miami, Florida home kitchen that is earning her big-name clients and her very own billboard. It all started with a Sunday trip to Target when Taylor asked her parents for a toy   “I told her, ‘You know what? Find a way to get the money”  Vernon Moxey, Taylor’s dad, told TODAY.com. “She asked, ‘Can I sell cookies?’”   Moxey, who works as an etiquette consultant but says he was at one point homeless, decided to use this as a life lesson to teach Taylor about being self-sufficient. They wrote out a business agreement on a napkin and Moxey gave Taylor $40 as a loan. Taylor used that money to whip up cookies and brownies, which she then took to church that Sunday to sell after the service.

“Honestly, I didn’t think she would make $40 back,” Moxey said. Taylor ended up making more than enough to pay her dad back and cover the toy. She walked away with $175.  Soon after, people from the congregation began calling Taylor asking her to bring her cookies back again. She also entered the KISS Country Midtown Miami Cornbread Competition, where, after competing against adults, she won first place a $250 prize, a billboard and a reputation as one of the town’s top bakers.

“Everything went bonkers,” Moxey said, adding that his daughter’s clients include former Miami Heat player Joel Anthony and HGTV designer Bobby Berk. “Suddenly I’m taking orders for Taylor’s Cookies and Cupcakes.” For Taylor, it seems that the business is more fun than hard work. “I think baking is mostly my passion,” she said. “You get to take your recipe and different people’s recipes and add different things to them.” She’s hoping to host a party this summer serving cupcakes with palm trees on the frosting.  Taylor credits Martha Stewart among her inspirations. She not only makes the baked goods out of her parents’ kitchen, but she also creates a custom box for each customer, made with stickers, markers and other handmade decorations.

“It’s almost nostalgic,” Moxey said. “She takes time to color it, put stickers on it. People say they made them feel like a kid again.”  Taylor has made nearly $10,000 so far, she donates 30 percent of her proceeds to raise dyslexia awareness, a learning disorder that her own dad has. “If you have a platform and people can hear your voice, it’s important to use it for some good,” Moxey said.  Orders continue to pour in for Taylor’s confectioneries, her parents are making a strong effort to keep the business under control so Taylor can focus on being a kid. “I don’t want to take away her childhood,” Moxey said. “Every decision is cleared by us, but we allow her to make the decision.”

rectumofglory
toxicnebulae:

nowyoukno:

Source for more like this follow NowYouKno

its name is the University of al-Qarawiyyin
the woman’s name was Fatima al-Fihri
failing to mention the names contributes to the erasure of the accomplishments of people, and especially women, of colour throughout history
once again: her name was FATIMA AL-FIHRI

toxicnebulae:

nowyoukno:

Source for more like this follow NowYouKno

its name is the University of al-Qarawiyyin

the woman’s name was Fatima al-Fihri

failing to mention the names contributes to the erasure of the accomplishments of people, and especially women, of colour throughout history

once again: her name was FATIMA AL-FIHRI