rectumofglory

queensansa-stark:

History Meme:
4/6 Women » Ada Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852)

Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, born Augusta Ada Byron and now commonly known as Ada Lovelace, was an English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognized as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often considered the world’s first computer programmer. [X] [X]

transformativetidbits
teashoesandhair:

teashoesandhair:

Can we talk about Ada Lovelace for a minute though because she is one of the biggest history bamfs that not many people have heard of, and if it weren’t for her, you wouldn’t be using the computer that you’re using now to read this eulogistic shit:
Firstly, look how bitchin’ she was. That sass was handed down to her by both her parents; the super intelligent Lady Anna Isabella Milbanke, who received a Cambridge University education in her own home in the very early 1800s, all whilst having a vagina, and the mad, bad and dangerous to know Lord George Byron (yes, that Lord Byron). Basically, Ada’s genetics were plucked straight from the tree of promise and flowered into the fruits of genius. Badass. 
Byron left Ada’s mother when Ada was only a baby, and her mother never forgave him. In an attempt to prevent Ada from turning out to be as ‘morally fractured’ as her father, her mother banned her from pursuing any of the Arts, instead insisting that she focus on Mathematics and Science. She also banned Ada from seeing any portrait of her father until she was 20, which is a bit weird, all things told. This didn’t really have the desired effect - although Ada became highly interested in both philosophies, she also developed a deep sense of interest and admiration for her father, whom she never met, and who died in Greece when she was 8. Essentially, her mother’s insistence that she become anything but alike to her father made her want to be like him even more. Rad. 
Armed with a wish to be more than just a Mathematician, Ada developed her own scientific approach which she called ‘poetical science’, which essentially meant she used both her highly trained logistical skills and her inherent creativity to ask bigger questions, and get better answers. This is what later allowed her to see the potential in an already established computing machine (we shall discuss that later). Girl got shit done. A+.
When she was 27, she translated an article written by an Italian dude, Luigi Manabrea (yeah, the dude who later became President of Italy. Nbd), about Charles Babbage’s ‘Analytical Engine’; a mechanical machine largely agreed by historians as the first functional computer. When translating the article, Ada added an extensive supplementary of notes, which she entitled ‘Notes’ (she wasn’t one to fuck around). These notes contained what is generally recognised as the first computer algorithm.
She then began to write extensively on the capabilities of Babbage’s machine. While most engineers, including Babbage himself, only believed that the machine was capable of basic number crunching, Ada didn’t agree. She foresaw that, with the correct algorithm applied, the machine could be capable of many other tasks, such as composing music to ‘any degree of complexity or extent’. She basically predicted Garageband. 
Her published algorithm, recognised as the first computer programme by most reputable scientists (we’ll get to that later) was an algorithm designed to allow the Analytical Engine to calculate Bernoulli numbers. I don’t even know how to explain that, mostly because I’m not Ada Lovelace, but rest assured that Bernoulli numbers are complicated as shit and it was all very impressive. Bitchin’. 
After her death, many small-brained and smaller-dicked male mathematicians of the time began to realise something with a dawning sense of horror. Ada Lovelace had been a woman, and she’d made huge contributions to their field. Luckily for them, she’d been largely overlooked in life due to the fact that she had a chromosomal deficiency known as ‘being a biological female’, and so they were able to discredit her fairly easily. Although Babbage himself wrote that the algebraic formula used to create the algorithm was ‘entirely her own’, apart from the Bernoulli number formula itself (which Babbage wrote out but Ada later corrected), and that he ‘suggested that she add some notes to Manabrea’s memoir’, the selection of which ‘was entirely her own’, many modern historians still maintain that Ada’s contributions were minimal. Babbage historian Bruce Collier wrote that Babbage himself authored the notes on Manabrea’s article, and that Ada had an ‘amazing delusion’ about her own talents, and only a ‘shallow understanding’ of the Analytical Engine. When did he write this? The enlightened, gender equal age of 1990. 
So, in a nutshell, Ada Lovelace was a complete and utter bamf. Throw into the works the fact that she became an expert in bird anatomy at the age of 12 because she wanted to design wings that would fly; she almost eloped at 18 but was found out; and she dismissed her children’s schoolteacher because he kept trying to have an affair with her, and you get the idea; Ada Lovelace has been sorely overlooked by history, largely because she committed the heinous crime of being born a woman.

Bringing this back for Ada Lovelace Day! (October 14th)

teashoesandhair:

teashoesandhair:

Can we talk about Ada Lovelace for a minute though because she is one of the biggest history bamfs that not many people have heard of, and if it weren’t for her, you wouldn’t be using the computer that you’re using now to read this eulogistic shit:

  • Firstly, look how bitchin’ she was. That sass was handed down to her by both her parents; the super intelligent Lady Anna Isabella Milbanke, who received a Cambridge University education in her own home in the very early 1800s, all whilst having a vagina, and the mad, bad and dangerous to know Lord George Byron (yes, that Lord Byron). Basically, Ada’s genetics were plucked straight from the tree of promise and flowered into the fruits of genius. Badass. 

  • Byron left Ada’s mother when Ada was only a baby, and her mother never forgave him. In an attempt to prevent Ada from turning out to be as ‘morally fractured’ as her father, her mother banned her from pursuing any of the Arts, instead insisting that she focus on Mathematics and Science. She also banned Ada from seeing any portrait of her father until she was 20, which is a bit weird, all things told. This didn’t really have the desired effect - although Ada became highly interested in both philosophies, she also developed a deep sense of interest and admiration for her father, whom she never met, and who died in Greece when she was 8. Essentially, her mother’s insistence that she become anything but alike to her father made her want to be like him even more. Rad. 

  • Armed with a wish to be more than just a Mathematician, Ada developed her own scientific approach which she called ‘poetical science’, which essentially meant she used both her highly trained logistical skills and her inherent creativity to ask bigger questions, and get better answers. This is what later allowed her to see the potential in an already established computing machine (we shall discuss that later). Girl got shit done. A+.

  • When she was 27, she translated an article written by an Italian dude, Luigi Manabrea (yeah, the dude who later became President of Italy. Nbd), about Charles Babbage’s ‘Analytical Engine’; a mechanical machine largely agreed by historians as the first functional computer. When translating the article, Ada added an extensive supplementary of notes, which she entitled ‘Notes’ (she wasn’t one to fuck around). These notes contained what is generally recognised as the first computer algorithm.

  • She then began to write extensively on the capabilities of Babbage’s machine. While most engineers, including Babbage himself, only believed that the machine was capable of basic number crunching, Ada didn’t agree. She foresaw that, with the correct algorithm applied, the machine could be capable of many other tasks, such as composing music to ‘any degree of complexity or extent’. She basically predicted Garageband. 

  • Her published algorithm, recognised as the first computer programme by most reputable scientists (we’ll get to that later) was an algorithm designed to allow the Analytical Engine to calculate Bernoulli numbers. I don’t even know how to explain that, mostly because I’m not Ada Lovelace, but rest assured that Bernoulli numbers are complicated as shit and it was all very impressive. Bitchin’. 

  • After her death, many small-brained and smaller-dicked male mathematicians of the time began to realise something with a dawning sense of horror. Ada Lovelace had been a woman, and she’d made huge contributions to their field. Luckily for them, she’d been largely overlooked in life due to the fact that she had a chromosomal deficiency known as ‘being a biological female’, and so they were able to discredit her fairly easily. Although Babbage himself wrote that the algebraic formula used to create the algorithm was ‘entirely her own’, apart from the Bernoulli number formula itself (which Babbage wrote out but Ada later corrected), and that he ‘suggested that she add some notes to Manabrea’s memoir’, the selection of which ‘was entirely her own’, many modern historians still maintain that Ada’s contributions were minimal. Babbage historian Bruce Collier wrote that Babbage himself authored the notes on Manabrea’s article, and that Ada had an ‘amazing delusion’ about her own talents, and only a ‘shallow understanding’ of the Analytical Engine. When did he write this? The enlightened, gender equal age of 1990. 

So, in a nutshell, Ada Lovelace was a complete and utter bamf. Throw into the works the fact that she became an expert in bird anatomy at the age of 12 because she wanted to design wings that would fly; she almost eloped at 18 but was found out; and she dismissed her children’s schoolteacher because he kept trying to have an affair with her, and you get the idea; Ada Lovelace has been sorely overlooked by history, largely because she committed the heinous crime of being born a woman.

Bringing this back for Ada Lovelace Day! (October 14th)

rectumofglory

themarysue:

Ada was born in 1815, the only legitimate child of poet/loveable whack-job Lord Byron (you know, the guy who hung out with Shelley and Keats? And wrote Don Juan and Childe Harold? And then went a bit nuts and tried to take over Greece? Yeah, that guy). Ada never met her father, since he was off being kind of nuts, and her mother was like “Ada, you are ONLY learning MATH and SCIENCE lest you become like your CRAZY FATHER by indulging in EVIL POETRY.”

But you just couldn’t hold Ada down because she did what she wanted to, you know? Ill a bunch as a child (and not like, “the illest” or whatever; like, ACTUALLY sick), Ada spent a lot of time reading (shout-out to frail, shy kids that read a lot of books) and developing her interest in the sciences. But fascinated by stories of her father, Ada wasn’t all about numbers – at 12, she decided that she wanted to fly, and used her wild imagination and scientific know-how to design a pair of mechanical wings, so basically she INVENTED Steampunk. By 18, she was having an affair with her tutor (YEAH SHE DID), but Ada’s mother covered it all up by sending her to court and marrying her off to a Baron, with whom she would have three kids but WHATEVER.

But do you think Ada let the married life slow her down HELL NAW SHE DIDN’T. She loved gambling and parties, and her chillness with dudes meant she was often followed by scandalous gossip (some things never change, amiright?). Obsessed with fairies and the “unseen worlds around us,” Ada would come to describe herself as an “Analyst (& Metaphysician),” studying “poetical science,” and publishing papers about how the brain creates thoughts and how music relates to math. Holy DAMN try to tell me that’s not kick-ass because I WON’T BELIEVE YOU.

- It’s Ada Lovelace Day, So Here’s A Brief History Of Her EXTREME RADNESS | The Mary Sue

angrywocunited
humans-of-pdx:

"I had a bacterial infection when I was two that turned into gangrene. People don’t believe all the things I can do. Like write. I have some of the best handwriting in my class." She put her arms together to show me how she would hold a pencil or pen. "Are you in school?" "Well I just finished medical school to become a medical assistant." Just then she got a phone call, swiped open the touch screen and effortlessly held the phone up to her ear. I waited patiently as she tried to work out some logistics with a family member. "That was my grandma. She’s on her way to pick me up and take me to my dance studio." "You dance?" "Yeah, you should come to my performance." I told her I would absolutely love to.

humans-of-pdx:

"I had a bacterial infection when I was two that turned into gangrene. People don’t believe all the things I can do. Like write. I have some of the best handwriting in my class." She put her arms together to show me how she would hold a pencil or pen. 

"Are you in school?" 

"Well I just finished medical school to become a medical assistant." Just then she got a phone call, swiped open the touch screen and effortlessly held the phone up to her ear. I waited patiently as she tried to work out some logistics with a family member. "That was my grandma. She’s on her way to pick me up and take me to my dance studio." 

"You dance?" 

"Yeah, you should come to my performance." 

I told her I would absolutely love to.

zebablah

redsuns-n-orangemoons:

huffposttv:

'American Horror Story: Freak Show' Shares Fascinating Videos Featuring 'Extra-Ordinary' Cast

FX has shared two mini-docs featuring the “extra-ordinary” cast members of “American Horror Story: Freak Show:” Mat Fraser, who plays “Paul The Illustrated Seal,” and Rose Siggins, “Legless Suzi.”

Watch both the mini-documentaries and learn about the incredible cast of “Freak Show” here.

i appreciate that instead of just using these people for shock value, they are treating them like human beings and telling their stories.

congalineofdurin
gavinscreamingmichaelyelling:

time-is-a-many-splendored-thing:

douglasmurphy:

rainbowcoffin:

c-h-0-w:

nightwife:

Always reblog

Woah

well he really should have worn more protective clothing if he didn’t want that to happensounds to me like he was asking for it

Are we really sure he was actually shot and decapitated? Idk, sounds like something he would’ve made up. Guys make false decapitation accusations all the time, you know. 

If he didn’t want to be decapitated, he shouldn’t have worn a shirt that showed off his neck

I mean, not all woman decapitate people. I’m not like that.

gavinscreamingmichaelyelling:

time-is-a-many-splendored-thing:

douglasmurphy:

rainbowcoffin:

c-h-0-w:

nightwife:

Always reblog

Woah

well he really should have worn more protective clothing if he didn’t want that to happen
sounds to me like he was asking for it

Are we really sure he was actually shot and decapitated? Idk, sounds like something he would’ve made up. Guys make false decapitation accusations all the time, you know. 

If he didn’t want to be decapitated, he shouldn’t have worn a shirt that showed off his neck

I mean, not all woman decapitate people. I’m not like that.

unwinona
dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

wildunicornherd

wildunicornherd:

For their Girls Who Code final project, high schoolers Sophie Houser and Andrea Gonzales created Tampon Run, a side-scroller where the player throws tampons at enemies and must collect more to stay in the game.

From the game’s intro:

Although the concept of the video game may be strange, it’s stranger that our society has accepted and normalized guns and violence through video games, yet we still find tampons and menstruation unspeakable.

P. S. Probably the game with the most everyday bodily-function stuff is The Sims…if Sims can use the toilet (and even piss themselves), why wouldn’t they have periods? Anyway, turns out there’s a mod for that.

P. P. S. My high score is only 56 :(