beatonna
beatonna:

"Henry the 5th
This Prince after he succeeded to the throne grew quite reformed and amiable, forsaking all his dissipated Companions, & never thrashing Sir William again. During his reign, Lord Cobham was burnt alive, but I forget what for. His Majesty then turned his thoughts to France, where he went & fought the famous Battle of Agincourt. He afterwards married the King’s daughter Catherine, a very agreeable Woman by Shakespear’s account. Inspite of all this however, he died, and was succeeded by his son Henry.”
15 year old Jane writes English History.  A reader sent me this one, it’s really great.  Click through the image.

beatonna:

"Henry the 5th

This Prince after he succeeded to the throne grew quite reformed and amiable, forsaking all his dissipated Companions, & never thrashing Sir William again. During his reign, Lord Cobham was burnt alive, but I forget what for. His Majesty then turned his thoughts to France, where he went & fought the famous Battle of Agincourt. He afterwards married the King’s daughter Catherine, a very agreeable Woman by Shakespear’s account. Inspite of all this however, he died, and was succeeded by his son Henry.”

15 year old Jane writes English History.  A reader sent me this one, it’s really great.  Click through the image.

lazybookreviews

lazybookreviews:

Of course Emily Bronte is a Slytherin.

themarysue

medievalpoc:

poc-creators:

Belle Director Amma Assante explains why she wanted to tell a Jane Austen Story with a Black Protagonist

Belle will be released in the US on May 2. 

Why did you decide to go the route of the Austenesque romance to tell her story?

In so many ways, it’s a romantic love story and it’s a paternal love story as well. It’s as much about her and [her surrogate father] Lord Mansfield, and also the fact that her biological father loved her as well.

It was much more practical in those days, if you had an illegitimate child of color, you could bring them into the household but had to keep them in the servant’s quarters, and have them work with servants where they’d be safe but wouldn’t be a full part of the family. The fact that her father decided that he didn’t want her to be brought up that way and brought her to his uncle [Lord Mansfield] and said, “Love her as I would had I been here,” was important to me.

When I did the research, it surprised me how many people had left Dido money in their will — Lord Mansfield left her money in his will [and] Lady Mary, Lord Mansfield’s sister, also left Dido in her will. The reality of it, then, was that so many people clearly [and] on paper showed their love for Dido that I thought it would have been disingenuous for me to tell a story purely about her suffering and a story that wasn’t about her love.

She had great love. That she married John Davinier, that she was able to baptize all of her children with him in the same church that they married in, I found that that was very romantic and beautiful.

I also wanted to understand, or communicate to the audience, what kind of men would love Dido during this period. Lord Mansfield, who adopted her, and also John [her husband] — what would make them so brave and so courageous enough to be able to love this woman of color during that period?

If I’m honest, I wanted to show a woman of color being loved. We don’t see it that often. I wanted to change the conversation a little bit, change the dialogue a little bit — we are loved, [and] we can be loved. Dido was valuable enough to be loved, she was worthy of being loved, and she was loved. Her challenge was showing people the right way to love her in the way that she needed to be. MORE

Belle Director Amma Asante on Challenging Stereotypes About Black Directors

Switching gears a bit, how did you make that transition from acting to directing?

I had been writing and producing for quite a while in British television. I wanted to circle my screenplays around some of the things that we’ve discussed — race, gender, and class — and I wasn’t sure that TV was the right place for me to do it.

I had written my first script, A Way of Life — which, thankfully, went on to do quite well critically, and won me a BAFTA and lots of other international awards — and I was very protective of it.

One day, one of my funders at the BFI called me in and said, “Hey. I know you would really like to produce this movie, and that’s all very well, but actually we’d love you to direct it.” I sort of shrunk back into the sofa and said, “No, no. That’s not something I can do. I’m a writer. What I do is write, and this is the best thing I’ve ever written to date, and I don’t want to be the person who ruins it by trying to direct it. This movie is my baby and I’m not going to kill it!”

They were very adamant and said, “Look. You’re not going to kill your movie. We’ll send you to film school for a month” — like a month of film school, what’s that? — “And we’re going to give you some money so that you can shoot a pilot of the movie. We want you do a couple of scenes so you get used to getting behind the camera then we want you to go off and make a movie.”

It took about a month to convince me, to get the courage to accept the offer. Off I went to film school and had one-to-one training with cinematographers, other directors, and editors — I literally had one to one time with all of the heads of department that you’ve have on a real movie, then I went off and shot a pilot. Then I thought, “Wow, I really like this.” Being able to create the characters and then see it through, it felt like, this is what I was born for. 

MORE

Awesome article on the upcoming film based on the life story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, a real noblewoman who lived in 1700s Scotland.

image

jennhammond

twinkleofafadingstar:

so Charlotte Bronte read Emma by Jane Austen and was really interested in this minor character named Jane Fairfax who was poor and would have been a governess had she not married well and then Bronte wrote her own novel exploring the plight of the poor governess who married this guy named Edward Fairfax Rochester in a novel called Jane Eyre and my point is don’t let anyone tell you shit about fanfiction.

flowerandbirds

allinablur:

Because it’s been 238 years since Jane Austen was born, let’s celebrate it with some snarky, witty Jane (from 22 years until 41):

Next week I shall begin my operations on my hat, on which you know my principal hopes of happiness depend. Letter (1798-10-27)

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal. Letter to Cassandra (1798-12-24)

I had a very pleasant evening, however, though you will probably find out that there was no particular reason for it; but I do not think it worth while to wait for enjoyment until there is some real opportunity for it. Letter (1799-01-21)

She would tell you herself that she has a very dreadful cold in her head at present; but I have not much compassion for colds in the head without fever or sore throat. Letter to Cassandra (1799-01-21)

I cannot help thinking that it is more natural to have flowers grow out of the head than fruit. Letter to Cassandra (1799-06-11) on decorating her hat

I can recollect nothing more to say at present; perhaps breakfast may assist my ideas. I was deceived — my breakfast supplied only two ideas — that the rolls were good and the butter bad. Letter (1799-06-19)

I believe I drank too much wine last night at Hurstbourne; I know not how else to account for the shaking of my hand today. You will kindly make allowance therefore for any indistinctness of writing, by attributing it to this venial error. Letter to Cassandra (1800-11-20)

We are to have a tiny party here tonight. I hate tiny parties, they force one into constant exertion. Letter (1801-05-21)

The pleasures of friendship, of unreserved conversation, of similarity of taste and opinions will make good amends for orange wine. Letter to Cassandra (1808-06-20)

I am sorry to tell you that I am getting very extravagant, and spending all my money, and, what is worse for you, I have been spending yours too. Letter to Cassandra (1811-04-18)

How horrible it is to have so many people killed! And what a blessing that one cares for none of them! Letter (1811-05-31) referring to the Peninsular War

I will not say that your mulberry-trees are dead, but I am afraid they are not alive. Letter to Cassandra (1811-05-31)

By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many douceurs in being a sort of chaperon, for I am put on the sofa near the fire and can drink as much wine as I like. Letter (1813-11-06) on ageing

I cannot help hoping that many will feel themselves obliged to buy it. I shall not mind imagining it a disagreeable duty to them, so as they do it. Letter (1813-11-06) on the reprint of Sense and Sensibility

There are such beings in the world — perhaps one in a thousand — as the creature you and I should think perfection; where grace and spirit are united to worth, where the manners are equal to the heart and understanding; but such a person may not come in your way, or, if he does, he may not be the eldest son of a man of fortune, the near relation of your particular friend, and belonging to your own county. Letter to Fanny Knight (1814-11-18) on finding love

He and I should not in the least agree, of course, in our ideas of novels and heroines. Pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked; but there is some very good sense in what he says, and I particularly respect him for wishing to think well of all young ladies; it shows an amiable and a delicate mind. And he deserves better treatment than to be obliged to read any more of my works. Letter to Fanny Knight (1816-03-23)

I could no more write a romance than an epic poem. I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to keep it up and never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter. No, I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other. Letter to Mr. Clarke (1816-04-01)

We saw a countless number of post-chaises full of boys pass by yesterday morning — full of future heroes, legislators, fools, and villains. You have never thanked me for my last letter, which went by the cheese. I cannot bear not to be thanked. Letter to J. Edward Austen (1816-07-09)

I would recommend to her and Mr. D. the simple regimen of separate rooms. Letter (1817-02-20) on Mrs. Deedes having an eighteenth child

[all these quotes belong to Letters of Jane Austen - Brabourne Edition // copy & paste from Wikiquote] 

shingekigofuckyourself
beansidhe:

archiemcphee:

Jane Austen Temporary Tattoos - These temporary tattoos let you show your love for Jane Austen in a way that she wouldn’t have approved of at all! Our favorite is the “Imprudent” lower back tattoo. 
Buy them here

Hanna I think of you when I see these things

beansidhe:

archiemcphee:

Jane Austen Temporary Tattoos - These temporary tattoos let you show your love for Jane Austen in a way that she wouldn’t have approved of at all! Our favorite is the “Imprudent” lower back tattoo. 

Buy them here

Hanna I think of you when I see these things

sashayed
Well, Miss Elliot,” lowering his voice, “as I was saying, we shall never agree, I suppose, upon this point. No man and woman would, probably. But let me observe that all histories are against you — all stories, prose and verse. If I had such a memory as Benwick, I could bring you fifty quotations in a moment on my side the argument, and I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman’s inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman’s fickleness. But perhaps, you will say, these were all written by men.”

"Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.