archifist

dcpubliclibrary:

nprbooks:

How, how has it taken so long for me to discover the awesomeness that is the Piebrarian? Avid reader and baker Hanna posts literature-inspired pie recipes every other Friday, complete with spoiler-free synopses and analyses of how her recipes relate to the chosen book — like the Bennet Sisters Tea Tart pictured here. 

Chocolate ganache infused with lavender and earl grey in a lemon sweet pastry crust, inspired by Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

The chocolate ganache filling has five ingredients, one for each of the Bennet sisters. Lydia, decadent and silly, is the chocolate. Kitty, barely there (but still important), is the vanilla. Jane, sweet and wholesome, is the lavender. Lizzy, strong and a little bitter, is the earl grey tea. And Mary, sensible and slightly bland, holds it all together as the cream.

You can even browse pie recipes by canon and author — are you in the mood for cult classics? Comedies of manners? Neil Gaiman?

Now, if you’ll pardon me, it’s a perfect weekend to bake some Princess Bride-inspired blackberry-peach pie.

And just because I can’t resist … WHEN COME BACK BRING PIE!!

— Petra

imagebetween this and Fictitious Dishes, we’re getting hungry!

He had, in fact, though his sisters were now doing all they could for him, by calling him “poor Richard,” been nothing better than a thick-headed, unfeeling, unprofitable Dick Musgrove, who had never done anything to entitle himself to more than the abbreviation of his name, living or dead.
Jane Austen straight-up calling this guy a dick in Persuasion
rectumofglory
rectumofglory:

if you are a female and have ever been a hard-core fan of something especially jane austen novels, then please watch this movie
it is a+ excellent fun a hilarious romp 
im rewatching it rn with my sister and mum and they are both loving it
also if you’ve ever wanted to see people in regency clothes bop along to it’s getting hot in here by nelly, this movie is 4 u

rectumofglory:

if you are a female and have ever been a hard-core fan of something especially jane austen novels, then please watch this movie

it is a+ excellent fun a hilarious romp 

im rewatching it rn with my sister and mum and they are both loving it

also if you’ve ever wanted to see people in regency clothes bop along to it’s getting hot in here by nelly, this movie is 4 u

beatonna
beatonna:

"Henry the 5th
This Prince after he succeeded to the throne grew quite reformed and amiable, forsaking all his dissipated Companions, & never thrashing Sir William again. During his reign, Lord Cobham was burnt alive, but I forget what for. His Majesty then turned his thoughts to France, where he went & fought the famous Battle of Agincourt. He afterwards married the King’s daughter Catherine, a very agreeable Woman by Shakespear’s account. Inspite of all this however, he died, and was succeeded by his son Henry.”
15 year old Jane writes English History.  A reader sent me this one, it’s really great.  Click through the image.

beatonna:

"Henry the 5th

This Prince after he succeeded to the throne grew quite reformed and amiable, forsaking all his dissipated Companions, & never thrashing Sir William again. During his reign, Lord Cobham was burnt alive, but I forget what for. His Majesty then turned his thoughts to France, where he went & fought the famous Battle of Agincourt. He afterwards married the King’s daughter Catherine, a very agreeable Woman by Shakespear’s account. Inspite of all this however, he died, and was succeeded by his son Henry.”

15 year old Jane writes English History.  A reader sent me this one, it’s really great.  Click through the image.

lazybookreviews

lazybookreviews:

Of course Emily Bronte is a Slytherin.

themarysue

medievalpoc:

poc-creators:

Belle Director Amma Assante explains why she wanted to tell a Jane Austen Story with a Black Protagonist

Belle will be released in the US on May 2. 

Why did you decide to go the route of the Austenesque romance to tell her story?

In so many ways, it’s a romantic love story and it’s a paternal love story as well. It’s as much about her and [her surrogate father] Lord Mansfield, and also the fact that her biological father loved her as well.

It was much more practical in those days, if you had an illegitimate child of color, you could bring them into the household but had to keep them in the servant’s quarters, and have them work with servants where they’d be safe but wouldn’t be a full part of the family. The fact that her father decided that he didn’t want her to be brought up that way and brought her to his uncle [Lord Mansfield] and said, “Love her as I would had I been here,” was important to me.

When I did the research, it surprised me how many people had left Dido money in their will — Lord Mansfield left her money in his will [and] Lady Mary, Lord Mansfield’s sister, also left Dido in her will. The reality of it, then, was that so many people clearly [and] on paper showed their love for Dido that I thought it would have been disingenuous for me to tell a story purely about her suffering and a story that wasn’t about her love.

She had great love. That she married John Davinier, that she was able to baptize all of her children with him in the same church that they married in, I found that that was very romantic and beautiful.

I also wanted to understand, or communicate to the audience, what kind of men would love Dido during this period. Lord Mansfield, who adopted her, and also John [her husband] — what would make them so brave and so courageous enough to be able to love this woman of color during that period?

If I’m honest, I wanted to show a woman of color being loved. We don’t see it that often. I wanted to change the conversation a little bit, change the dialogue a little bit — we are loved, [and] we can be loved. Dido was valuable enough to be loved, she was worthy of being loved, and she was loved. Her challenge was showing people the right way to love her in the way that she needed to be. MORE

Belle Director Amma Asante on Challenging Stereotypes About Black Directors

Switching gears a bit, how did you make that transition from acting to directing?

I had been writing and producing for quite a while in British television. I wanted to circle my screenplays around some of the things that we’ve discussed — race, gender, and class — and I wasn’t sure that TV was the right place for me to do it.

I had written my first script, A Way of Life — which, thankfully, went on to do quite well critically, and won me a BAFTA and lots of other international awards — and I was very protective of it.

One day, one of my funders at the BFI called me in and said, “Hey. I know you would really like to produce this movie, and that’s all very well, but actually we’d love you to direct it.” I sort of shrunk back into the sofa and said, “No, no. That’s not something I can do. I’m a writer. What I do is write, and this is the best thing I’ve ever written to date, and I don’t want to be the person who ruins it by trying to direct it. This movie is my baby and I’m not going to kill it!”

They were very adamant and said, “Look. You’re not going to kill your movie. We’ll send you to film school for a month” — like a month of film school, what’s that? — “And we’re going to give you some money so that you can shoot a pilot of the movie. We want you do a couple of scenes so you get used to getting behind the camera then we want you to go off and make a movie.”

It took about a month to convince me, to get the courage to accept the offer. Off I went to film school and had one-to-one training with cinematographers, other directors, and editors — I literally had one to one time with all of the heads of department that you’ve have on a real movie, then I went off and shot a pilot. Then I thought, “Wow, I really like this.” Being able to create the characters and then see it through, it felt like, this is what I was born for. 

MORE

Awesome article on the upcoming film based on the life story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, a real noblewoman who lived in 1700s Scotland.

image

jennhammond

twinkleofafadingstar:

so Charlotte Bronte read Emma by Jane Austen and was really interested in this minor character named Jane Fairfax who was poor and would have been a governess had she not married well and then Bronte wrote her own novel exploring the plight of the poor governess who married this guy named Edward Fairfax Rochester in a novel called Jane Eyre and my point is don’t let anyone tell you shit about fanfiction.